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Source: Wikipedia

Women of the Ottoman Empire

Halide Edip Adivar, Fatma Aliye Topuz, Roxelana, Sabiha Gökçen, Mara Brankovic, May Torok von Szendro, Fatma Neslisah, Tirimüjgan Sultan, Amina Mihr-i Shah, Rabia Sultan, Gracia Mendes Nasi, Princess Durru Shehvar, Hatice Muazzez Sultan
2013. Taschenbuch. ca. 30 S. Kartoniert / Broschiert
Books LLC, Reference Series ISBN 978-1-156-66119-2
Format (B x L): 18,9 x 24,6 cm
Gewicht: 79 g
In englischer Sprache

Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 29. Chapters: Halide Edip Adivar, Fatma Aliye Topuz, Roxelana, Sabiha Gökçen, Mara Brankovic, May Torok von Szendro, Fatma Neslisah, Tirimüjgan Sultan, Amina Mihr-i Shah, Rabia Sultan, Gracia Mendes Nasi, Princess Durru Shehvar, Hatice Muazzez Sultan, Peyveste Emukhvari, Amina Gul-Bahar, Mihrimah Sultan, Kera Tamara, Hayranidil Kadinefendi, Neserek Haseki Kadin Efendi, Nigâr Hanim, Odalisque, Esma Sultana, Rahime Perestu, Maria Aurora of Spiegel, Princess Niloufer, Mahidevran, Adile Sultana, Emine Nazikeda, Devlet Hatun, Cahide Sonku, Gülüstü, Safiye Ali, Leyla Achba, Hatice Sultan, Gülcemal Sultan, Catharina Anna Grandon de Hochepied, Princess Hatice, Feriha Tevfik, Alexandra Mavrokordatou, Esther Handali, Esperanza Malchi, Mal Hatun, Nemzade Hatice Hanimsultan, Fehime Sultan. Excerpt: Halide Edip Adivar (Ottoman Turkish: ¿¿¿¿¿ ¿¿¿¿ ¿¿¿¿¿¿ ; sometimes spelled Halidé Edib in English) (1884- 9 January 1964) was a Turkish novelist and feminist political leader. She was best known for her novels criticizing the low social status of Turkish women and what she saw as the lack of interest of most women in changing their situation. Halide Edip was born in Istanbul(Constantinople). Her father was a secretary of the Ottoman Sultan Abdülhamid II. Edip was educated at home by private tutors from whom she learned European and Ottoman literature, religion, philosophy, sociology, piano, English, French, and Arabic. She learned Greek from her neighbors and from briefly attending a Greek school in Constantinople. She attended the American College for Girls briefly in 1893. In 1897, she translated Mother by Jacob Abbott, for which the sultan awarded her the Order of Charity (Nishan-i-Shafakat; Sefkat Nisani). She attended the American College again from 1899 to 1901, when she graduated. Her father's house was a center of intellectual activity in Istanbul and even as a child Halide Edip participated in the intellectual life of the city. After graduating, she married the mathematician and astronomer Salih Zeki Bey, with whom she had two sons. She continued her intellectual activities, however, and in 1908 began writing articles on education and on the status of women for Tevfik Fikret's newspaper Tanin. She published her first novel, Seviye Talip, in 1909. Because of her articles on education, the education ministry hired her to reform girls' schools in Istanbul. She worked with Nakiye Hanim on curriculum and pedagogy changes and also taught pedagogy, ethics, and history in various schools. She resigned over a disagreement with ministry concerning mosque schools. She received a divorce from Salih Zeki in 1910. Her house became an intellectual salon, especially for those interested in new concepts of Turkishness. She became involved with the Turkish Hearth (Türk Ocagi

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